1. So, today was a big trip to the Korean/International market, after browsing the farmers’ market.

    At the farmers’ market, I bought:

    • half a pound of “ugly” garlic - $2.40
    • two branches of red/yellow/orange Thai chiles - $2
    • a bag of “cosmetically challenged” shiitake mushrooms - $3

    Then at the Korean market, I went a little overboard:

    • 15 lbs Korean rice - $13
    • Korean green onions
    • perilla leaves
    • Korean peppers
    • Korean radish
    • pickling cucumbers
    • Chinese soy sauce
    • Chinese black vinegar
    • sesame oil
    • sake for cooking
    • makgeolli for drinking
    • instant dashi granules
    • Chinese “preserved vegetable”
    • pickled burdock root (gobo)
    • two types of furikake
    • half-sour deli pickles
    • thinly sliced pork butt (“for bulgogi”)
    • sliced beef tongue
    • beef banana shank
    • pressed tofu
    • unagi kabayaki
    • Japanese kurobuta sausage
    • shrimp shumai
    • pork shumai with shrimp
    • seasoned baby crabs banchan
    • sansho pepper
    • prik king paste

    4 weeks ago  /  1 note

  2. The first batch of fermentation pickles are canned and in the usually-coolest, most temperature-constant place in the apartment. I’ll burp them whenever I remember, hopefully at least twice a day.
CSA cucumbers, one jar of spears, one jar of slices, with dill and pickling spices. Each was inoculated with a few spoonfuls of liquid from storebought half-sours.
The jar in the back holds the remainders of the cucumbers, some tiny carrots, a head of garlic, two red pearl onions, an orange Thai chile, mustard seed, coriander seed, and turmeric; inoculated with raw sauerkraut and its juices.
I’ll be monitoring the temperature tonight with two separate thermometers, and comparing the readings. It’s a bit warm now, but it should cool off.
Coming up later: sauerkraut, turnips, Hunan chopped chiles, radish kimchi.

    The first batch of fermentation pickles are canned and in the usually-coolest, most temperature-constant place in the apartment. I’ll burp them whenever I remember, hopefully at least twice a day.

    CSA cucumbers, one jar of spears, one jar of slices, with dill and pickling spices. Each was inoculated with a few spoonfuls of liquid from storebought half-sours.

    The jar in the back holds the remainders of the cucumbers, some tiny carrots, a head of garlic, two red pearl onions, an orange Thai chile, mustard seed, coriander seed, and turmeric; inoculated with raw sauerkraut and its juices.

    I’ll be monitoring the temperature tonight with two separate thermometers, and comparing the readings. It’s a bit warm now, but it should cool off.

    Coming up later: sauerkraut, turnips, Hunan chopped chiles, radish kimchi.

    4 weeks ago  /  1 note

  3. omasknut:

#cestdoux #tsubame #izakaya #encornetaukoji @karine_v

    omasknut:

    #cestdoux #tsubame #izakaya #encornetaukoji @karine_v

    1 month ago  /  1 note  /  Source: omasknut

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    1 month ago  /  8 notes  /  Source: kblog.lunchboxbunch.com

  5. Now that’s a dosa.

    Now that’s a dosa.

    (via wordsofapurpleman)

    1 month ago  /  120,824 notes  /  Source: bircls

  6. eataku:

It’s enough hard to find good bonjiri (chicken butt) at yakitori joints in NYC. And then, when and if you do come across a place that serves it, the bonjiri is usually limited and pricey. But here in Japan, they’re now selling it in convenience stores!!

More questionable than US convenience store hot dogs? It’s hard to say. Chicken “butt” (actually fatty tail nub with skin?) in a plastic bag with sauce under heat lamps. Ehh….

    eataku:

    It’s enough hard to find good bonjiri (chicken butt) at yakitori joints in NYC. And then, when and if you do come across a place that serves it, the bonjiri is usually limited and pricey. But here in Japan, they’re now selling it in convenience stores!!

    More questionable than US convenience store hot dogs? It’s hard to say. Chicken “butt” (actually fatty tail nub with skin?) in a plastic bag with sauce under heat lamps. Ehh….

    (via theposhpanda)

    1 month ago  /  34 notes  /  Source: eataku

  7. Breakfast yesterday. Two eggs, five yolks.

    Breakfast yesterday. Two eggs, five yolks.

    1 month ago  /  1 note

  8. I have the sudden urge to turn an entire pork tenderloin into one giant tonkatsu.

    2 months ago  /  0 notes

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    2 months ago  /  9 notes

  10. hellaveganeats:

TONIGHT @dearmomsf 2700 Harrison SF, CA 5pm to 11pm! Hella Vegan Izakaya Eats! See you cuties there!! #izakaya #hellavegan #hellaveganizakaya #snoggle #hellaveganeats (at Dear Mom)

    hellaveganeats:

    TONIGHT @dearmomsf 2700 Harrison SF, CA 5pm to 11pm! Hella Vegan Izakaya Eats! See you cuties there!! #izakaya #hellavegan #hellaveganizakaya #snoggle #hellaveganeats (at Dear Mom)

    2 months ago  /  1 note  /  Source: hellaveganeats

  11. Chicken-Cheese-Tortilla Thing

    no-more-ramen:

    Honestly, I don’t know what this dish should be called. It’s kind of like a fried rice in preparation, but probably the ugliest-looking dish I have ever created, but it’s also ridiculously delicious for only ~5 minutes of prep and 3 minutes of cooking. Treat yourself to something quick to make and filling! Double the recipe and fridge the leftovers for a protein and energy-filled breakfast to start your day well, you deserve it!

    Ingredients

    • Oil for cooking (I used peanut, but any oil works, depending on your seasonings)
    • 2 medium tortillas (use corn or gluten-free tortillas to make it gluten-free)
    • 2 handfuls of pre-cooked chicken, shredded or in bite-sized pieces (I used leftovers from a grocery store rotisserie chicken)
    • 2 handfuls shredded cheese (I used about 4oz of mozzarella, just make sure you pick a cheese that melts into strings well, any pizza cheese would do well.)
    • Seasoning mix (I recommend Cajun, but pick whatever your tastebuds desire!)

     Equipment

    • Frying pan
    • Heat-proof spatula
    • 2 forks or fork and knife

    Method

    1. Rip your tortilla to shreds about the length of your thumb and twice the width, or whatever size you’d like. Try to have the tortilla parts about the same size as the chicken. 
    2. Shred your chicken and grate your cheese into longish strands (for optimal melting). 
    3. Place the chicken, tortilla, and cheese in distinct piles onto whatever surface you’re using to shred everything. 
    4. Heat the oil in your pan at medium heat, adding seasonings if desired. 
    5. Throw in about 1/2 of the chicken, and stir around for about 30 seconds. 
    6. Add 1/2 the tortilla and stir again for 30 seconds. 
    7. Add another handful of chicken, and stir again for 30 seconds. 
    8. Add seasonings here if you want. They boost the flavour really well!
    9. Add the rest of tortilla and chicken, and stir again. 
    10. After everything seems heated through fully and you’re starting to get crispy bits, turn the heat off. 
    11. Fold in the cheese, stirring until mostly melted and strings are formed. 
    12. Take the food off the pan and cut into bite-sized pieces. You can eat this hot or cold after refrigerating. 

    Definitely not the prettiest meal, but packed with flavour and energy!

    You could probably call this migas. It would be even better if you add eggs or beans with the tortillas.

    3 months ago  /  81 notes  /  Source: no-more-ramen

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    3 months ago  /  156,529 notes  /  Source: pr1nceshawn

  13. Not impressed with pecorino romano on pizza or sliced on crackers. Too sheepy when it warms up. Guess I’ll try it next on pasta.

    4 months ago  /  2 notes

  14. Tofu Tacos

    I went with just batter, no panko. The batter was a bit thinner than I had hoped. Salt, pepper, cumin, paprika, flour, corn starch, vodka, water.

    The tofu was marinated in lemon juice, chipotles en adobo, minced garlic, Chinese cooking wine (the only flavorful liquor I had), salt, and water.

    Topped with celeriac slaw made from julienne celeriac, salt, lemon juice, apple cider vinegar, mayonnaise, Tabasco, and a bit of adobo from the chipotles.

    On flour tortillas.

    4 months ago  /  0 notes

  15. Tofu tacos tonight, probably with celeriac slaw and chipotle salsa. I can’t decide if I want to do plain batter or batter and panko.

    Right now I’m marinating sticks of tofu in chipotle-lemon-based marinade.

    4 months ago  /  0 notes